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In wildest dreams, a shot at reshaping nightmares | NWAonline

Her car is racing at a terrifying speed through the streets of a large city, and something gruesome, something with giant eyeballs, is chasing her, closing in fast. It was a dream, of course, and after Emily Gurule, a 50-year-old high school teacher, related it to Dr. Barry Krakow, he did not ask her to unpack its symbolism. He simply told her to think of a new one. “In your mind, with thinking and picturing, take a few minutes, close your eyes, and I want you to change the dream any way you wish,” said Krakow, founder of the PTSD Sleep Clinic at the Maimonides Sleep Arts and Sciences center in Albuquerque and a leading researcher of nightmares. And so ...


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www.cpaptalk.com • View topic - Sound Sleep, Sound Mind by Krakow

Sound Sleep, Sound Mind by Krakow by secret agent girl on Thu Aug 19, 2010 6:27 am Did anyone else happen to catch his webinar with NICABM--wondering what you thought of it. It's been such a busy summer, that I haven't been around here, and only thought of the forum after the presentation...sorry! I was impressed with his balanced approach and would let him be my doctor in a new york minute! Not that my sleep doc is no good, but Krakow is obviously quite an expert. Here's the outline he mostly covered: * It's quality, not necessarily quantity, that matters * Poor sleep, poor health: poor health, poor sleep * The Mind-Body connection of sleep * The role that breath plays in sleep disorders * Building a sleep quality brain trust * Treatment: emotional freedom to sleep without drugs


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Imagery Rehearsal Therapy for Acute Posttraumatic Nightmares Among Combat Soldiers in Iraq -- MOORE and KRAKOW 164 (4): 683 -- Am J Psychiatry

To the Editor: Imagery rehearsal therapy is an efficacious treatment for chronic nightmares. In one controlled study using this therapy, chronic posttraumatic stress symptoms decreased as well (1). However, imagery rehearsal therapy has not been tested on acute nightmares or acute posttraumatic stress symptoms. The following case series describes the use of imagery rehearsal therapy with U.S. Army combat soldiers deployed to Iraq. Only soldiers with a primary complaint of acute nightmares received treatment.


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Dream Theatre

Her car is racing at a terrifying speed through the streets of a large city, and something with giant eyeballs is chasing her, closing in fast. It was a dream, of course, and after Emily Gurule, a 50-year-old high school teacher, related it to Dr Barry Krakow, he simply told her to think of a new one. “In your mind, with thinking and picturing, take a few minutes, close your eyes, and I want you to change the dream any way you wish,” said Dr Krakow, founder of the Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Sleep Clinic at the Maimonides Sleep Arts and Sciences centre in New Mexico, US, and a leading researcher of nightmares.


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PTSD Disrupts Sleep/Wake Cycle — Psychiatric News

A retrospective study of 1,078 adults with PTSD treated at a sleep center documented round-the-clock sleep/wake disturbances. The higher their PTSD symptom scores, the more apt they were to report bedtime worries about losing sleep, racing thoughts, watching the clock, and restless legs syndrome. The same people reported trouble falling asleep, night waking, nightmares, periodic limb movements, and poor sleep. In the daytime, they had more trouble with memory and concentration, felt sleepier and more fatigued, and reported lower quality of life than those with lower PTSD scores. The severity of their symptoms was correlated with sleep factors that promote excess arousal, Barry Krakow, M.D., and colleagues at Maimonides Sleep Arts and Sciences in Albuquerque, N.M., reported at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies in June. Changes in the brain during sleep in people with PTSD may maintain or increase activity in arousal-promoting brain centers and reduce activity in sleep-promoting centers, Anne Germain, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, told Psychiatric News.


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